The Tutoring Center, Salem OR

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Math help in Salem, OR.

05/11/2015
Science is one topic that is really easy to stay active with over summer vacation because science is all around you. One fun way to learn about science this summer is by observing the weather. Far beyond watching the clouds, The Tutoring Center in Salem has a few quick science activities and experiments for you and your family to do this summer.

Make a Barometer

A barometer is a scientific instrument that is used to measure the change in air pressure and predict incoming storms or other extreme weather. You can make a simply barometer yourself at home with a balloon, glass jar, rubber band, a little tape, and a drinking straw. Simply stretch the balloon around the jar and secure it with the rubber band. Tape the straw horizontally to the top of the balloon’s surface. When there is high air pressure, it will push the balloon into the jar and point the straw “high”. Conversely, when there is low air pressure, the balloon will expand upwards pointing the straw “low”. You can keep track of your results and the following weather to try and predict patterns.

Make a Weathervane

Weathervanes typically measure the direction of wind at any time and sometimes the amount of rain received during a storm. There are numerous designs online to make an intricate weathervane, but you can make a simple one from a few pieces of plastic, a stick, a straw, and some tape. A rain gauge can easily be made by marking an empty plastic container along the sides in millimeters or centimeters. 

Keep your kids excited about learning this summer by making it fun! Never forget the importance of a well-rounded education. While science can be made fun relatively easy, other subjects may need some more work. If you are interested in our specially designed academic programs and one-to-one instruction in Salem, contact us today at (971) 600-3288. 

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